Today we would like to continue the series about popular job search misconceptions which we have started earlier. Since our priority is helping people succeed in their job search efforts we would like that each and every person ordering our services or reading our blog would get the desired job. In order to achieve this goal, our team is willing to share a few more misconceptions people usually stick to when applying for a job...

Interviews and Employment

MythsIt makes sense to assume that the smartest candidate has an advantage and he/she will likely be hired. But that is not necessarily so if you know what hiring process is all about. It is true that companies are mostly interested in the candidates who have brains, but that is not the only thing they are looking for (unlike many job hunters think). Very often organizations and companies are looking for people who are capable of handling a wide range of job responsibilities. So transferable skills along with a strong commitment, in this case, can become the key to not only landing an interview but actually getting the job. If you have received an interview invitation you can say that your resume along with any other job seeking efforts have been successful.

There is one more step left to getting hired – interview. We tend to believe that almost every job seeker has heard that in order to successfully pass an interview one needs to be well-prepared. No one will argue with this fact. The problem is how people prepare for interviews. Job seekers believe that it is more than enough to have a look at the company website. But “having a look” is not enough. You are to carefully study and extract necessary information about the philosophy of the company, their customers, competitors as well as upper management. If you want to really have an advantage, then read the annual reports, business reviews, and press releases.

At the interview meeting itself, many job seekers wrongly assume they are just to answer questions posed by interviewing authorities. While it is true that the primary initiative to ask questions will belong to the interviewer (for obvious reasons), but you have right to also ask questions in order to show you did your homework and clarify details. The interview should look like an interrogation; you are not a suspect who is just to sit still honestly answering questions. Candidates have tools to maintain control and steer the conversation in a direction where you can show what they are made of. Unfortunately, the majority of candidates never prepare any questions, which often leads hiring authorities to believe that they didn't prepare for the interview at all.

Interview Tips

Prime-resume.com provides a wide range of services, including career assistance. We can help with finding professional employment agencies as well as offer assistance for a successful interview