As we have mentioned in the previous article getting the job of a manager is no easy task. One has to gain the necessary experience and skills in order to get a good start at the position. Now as you know how to become a successful manager we want to warn of common myths that most people have about the job of a manager. Sometimes we want something that looks attractive but as soon as we get it we begin to realize the true value and meaning of what we wanted. And often people get disappointed and frustrated because they had wrong expectations. In this article, we would like to list the most common myths that people have about the job of a manager. Maybe, just maybe this article will help job seekers better understand the nature of the position.

Most Common Myths About Managers

People want to become managers because they believe all the stereotypes everybody talks about. One of the popular ones is that managers don't really do anything apart from telling other employees what they should be doing. This stereotype was Puzzled-Guy_iStock_000014787161Smallprobably formed because employees never saw their managers do anything apart from talking to people (and that's exactly the way they are featured in movies usually). But the fact that you don't see a manager doing the work you are doing doesn't mean one doesn't do anything at all. Managers just do work that is different by nature from what other employees are doing. It is just as difficult as any other task if not more difficult. So if you want to become a manager just to rest at work, forget about that one. You will have more work and stress than most of the other employees in the company.

Another myth is about authority. It is somewhat connected to the previous one. Because people don't have to do anything at work they probably have significant authority over others. Wherever you worked you probably had the autonomy of action. And becoming a manager seems like a great opportunity to increase that autonomy. But as a matter of fact, becoming a manager is not the same as becoming a boss. Moreover, becoming a manager looks more like becoming a hostage of other people as well as circumstances. That's where most new managers face frustration - they are not prepared to see tight deadlines, goals, priorities, etc. Becoming a manager is not about telling others what they should do at work. It is about being constrained tightly by deadlines and goals.

Lastly, keeping the operation of the business running smoothly seems like the primary responsibility of a manager. And while it is true that making sure everything goes well, in general, is a big part of the job it is not the only task. Managers are expected to improve organizational processes even if they are not responsible for it. Moreover, very often managers have to go beyond their official area of authority in order to do the job. And even though no one is going to tell you that it is expected. So if you thought that becoming a manager is something you always wanted you might want to reconsider your career choice after reading this article.