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Don’t Ask These Questions at a Job Interview

Resume writing is an important stage of your job search campaign because depending on how well you prepare your main marketing document hiring managers either will invite you for an interview or ignore your job application. However, resume has never been a document that could grant an employment. This kind of decisions are made when after candidate passes a job interview. So it rally boils down to how well one goes through the interview, a resume or CV is just one of the means to get you there. They say that personality defines how well an interview goes but there are also some things job seekers have to be aware of when they prepare. And although some believe preparations don’t matter much in these things, we would strongly disagree with such a statement. We believe that preparing for a job interview can make a huge difference. And it is especially true when it comes to asking hiring authorities some questions.

Questions to Avoid

Every job interview is a dialogue, not an interrogation as many job seekers view this meeting. Obviously, hiring authorities are running the show asking all kinds of questions to figure out whether a candidate is a good match for the position. However, at the end of the meeting interviewing authorities provide an opportunity for a candidate to ask some questions. Those who go to interviews with no preparation usually don’t have any questions and even if they do, very often it would have been better not to ask them. The fact that a candidate doesn’t have any questions to ask can speak of one’s low interest in the job. But some questions could serve as a red flag for hiring managers so job seekers have to know which questions they should avoid asking when given such opportunity at a job interview.

Career_11. What does your company do?
2. How soon can I take a vacation?
3. When can I receive a raise?
4. What happens if I don’t get along with coworkers?
5. Do you monitor emails?
6. Can I arrive early if I get my work done?
7. Did I get the job?
8. Will I have my own office?
9. How soon can I get a promotion?
10. Do you do background checks?

Obviously, there are more questions you should avoid than those listed above. But these are kind of the most tempting questions candidates want to ask. All of them demonstrate the lack of understanding how the hiring process works as well as they are self-oriented. By asking any of those questions you are in effect saying “What is important for me is how much can I get out of this job for myself?”. Such approach isn’t effective since you did nothing for the company at this stage and thinking about yourself as opposed to thinking about the job isn’t what most hiring managers are looking for. So if you are really interested in the position then it is better to be employer-oriented both in your questions and your answers during the job interview.

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