Many job seekers share the confusion and frustration over the hiring process and employment situation today. It seems like it is nearly impossible to find a decent job without having any problems. It takes so much time and efforts to get hired, and even when you spend hours trying to obtain a specific position you often end up having nothing. The cry of the desperate job seekers goes something like “What’s wrong with me? What’s wrong with these companies? Why am I not getting any results with my resume?”

First and foremost, you need to know several facts to set your expectations right. Your resume was never meant to guarantee your employment. It is only an instrument to land you an interview. It is such a big mistake to assume that someone will hire you just on the basis of the things you have put on your resume (especially today, when the company’s economy has been shaky). Employers are hiring someone on the basis of an interview, not a written document. More than half of resumes received are never reviewed by the hiring authority representatives. There are many reasons for that, but the matter of the fact is that your resume might have never been looked at. Over 60 percent of resumes are reviewed by someone who may or may not be professional in conducting interviews. This may sound ridiculous, but it is true (even in large corporations). You can do pretty much nothing about this mess in the hiring process, but it will save your nerves if you have right expectations. When you cannot get employed, it is not only about you. Even having a professional and well-organized resume will not grant you an interview. Nevertheless, if your resume gets read, it should capture the attention of the one reading it. Otherwise, the result will not be much different as if it has never been read. desperateIn order to ensure your resume looks perfect, you have to follow three basic rules of resume writing.

1) Clear Message. There is no way someone will consider you for an interview if something is not clear from your resume. Names of the companies, your specific duties, measurable accomplishments, or educational credentials – these sections must clearly reflect your proficiencies and skills. Don’t try to misrepresent anything (especially your success indicators and dates of employment). Your resume has to bring the message of what kind of professional you are and what you can bring in to the company. If your high school kid can extract that from your resume – it means with the high probability that a hiring manager will as well.

2) Keep it simple. Avoid long and complicated phrases (we call them fluff statements) that bring no useful information for a potential employer, but “are meant to highlight how good you are”. Highly talented and committed accountant, sales manager with superb interpersonal and perfect communication skills, a great leader with a strong commitment…. Such statements irritate employers, thus doing more harm than good.

3) Back it all up. Whatever you say regarding your skills or proficiencies on your resume or cover letter, back it all up with practical experience. If you claim you are a sales exert you have to demonstrate that by showing that you have actually increased sales by 34% in one year at one of your previous employments. “

Why am I not getting any results with my resume?” – Now you know it’s not just you. You may not be getting the results because of the chaos in the hiring process. Or you have to work on your resume to make it better. Whatever is your case you have to make sure you do everything you can to land an interview.