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Resume Writing: Accomplishments

Most people believe that a resume is nothing but the list of past work experienced along with educational credentials. It is true that these sections make the main body of the resume but the truth of the matter is that there is much more to it. Today resumes became much more sophisticated as applicants are trying to make their way to the interview room and impress employers with professionally crafted resumes. Memberships, affiliations, trainings, technical proficiency, volunteering, community involvement – all of these things have become a part of resume writing process now. Another things job seekers are actively discussing is accomplishments and their place on a resume. That is what we will talk about in this article. We hope to shed some light on this topic and explain how accomplishments fit into the resume.

Where Do Your Accomplishments Belong on a Resume?

article-new_ehow_images_a08_4n_qv_comment-someones-strengths-accomplishments-800x800The accomplishments section has become a central part of effective resumes and CVs. Today employers don’t really care about routine responsibilities of a candidate so it is not very effective to pack your resume with extensive job descriptions alone. Experienced recruiters emphasize the importance of having accomplishments in the center of a resume as it gives an advantage over those who used to concentrate on daily duties. The question is where do they belong? Should you create a special section under which you are to list all of your accomplishments? If so, where does one put this section? Or maybe it is better to incorporate achievements into the work experience section? Well, it may seem difficult to figure this out but as a matter of fact it is quite easy. Here is why…

If you are an experienced executive and you have a successful career then it is most likely you will have enough of your achievements to offer to potential employers. In this case it is better to place your accomplishments under every employment. The majority of candidates just copy-paste job descriptions under each employment or list routine responsibilities. Having accomplishments instead would make a huge difference in the eyes of employers. However, not everybody has that many accomplishments. There are people who are just starting out and they have very few accomplishments if compared to experienced managers. In this case we recommend creating a special section at the beginning of a resume (after the summary section and before work experience) under each applicant may list major accomplishments.

It is important to say though that accomplishments are to be quantified for a better effect. If you worked in sales then it is a must to provide specific numbers how you grew the sales or revenue (either in % or $). Also, make sure you list real accomplishments, not the things that are considered your daily routine. Accomplishments should demonstrate what kind of results you achieved and how you did it. Everything that doesn’t meet that purpose is not considered an accomplishment and should be listed elsewhere.

Categories: Resume Writing

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