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How to Write an Entry Level Resume?

Those looking for the first job know how important it is to prepare a good resume. Despite the common argument that an entry level resume allows very little space for any manouver due to the lack of experience, almost all of them look the same. Therefore, some say it doesn’t make sense to work hard to write an effective resume for entry level positions. First of all, there is always room for adjustments. And secondly, lack of experience is never a good excuse for submitting a generic resume. It is especially true for those who are interested in entry level jobs/internships available at the top companies. If you have to develop such a resume, the chances are pretty high that you don’t know a thing about effective resume writing. If that is the case then you can count yourself lucky – below you will find some insightful tips that should get you going. You can always order our writing services if you don’t have time to do it yourself but if you do then here are some of the things you should know.

Components of an Entry Level Resume

writing-laptop-rgbLike any other resume, an entry level resume should start with the full name and contact information. We recommend making your name several point sizes larger than the rest of the content. As for the contact information, you should include your phone number and email address – these two are the primary means of contact of many employers. Make sure you don’t provide an email that could give an unprofessional picture of you. Leave email addresses like kissmeseventeen@yahoo.com or hotbabeforever@aol.com for your personal use. This sort of an introductory section shouldn’t take up much space so organize the information wisely. Now the next section most resume writers would talk about is objective but that is not what we think is the best thing to place after you contact information. More than that, we believe an objective to be a waste of space as it doesn’t bring any valuable information to the employers. Instead, we recommend incorporating a summary section under the contact information.

Since you are writing an entry level resume, most likely two-three bullet statements that provide general overview of your experience and skills will be enough. Obviously, you won’t have much to offer yet but there is still a good opportunity to show off the skills that are relevant for the applied position. Try not to use generic cliches, like great communication skills or detail-oriented professional; instead, provide specific information as to how you managed to them what were the results you achieved. This will take some time but it is worth it. As a matter of fact, this may be one of the most important sections on your resume and if you manage to make it relevant to the applying job, you will stand out among other candidates.

Then goes the education and professional experience sections. Don’t think you need to list everything you went through in the college or university. You can include relevant coursework and your GPA (if it is higher than 3.3). Don’t put your high school diploma – this kind of information does no good whatsoever. Considering the fact that you are writing an entry level resume, you probably don’t have many years of professional experience. But that doesn’t mean this section should be left out. Here you can include internships, volunteering and other extracurricular activities you believe are relevant to the applying position. You can then add the skills or technical proficiency section if you have any other skills you want to highlight.

Categories: Resume Writing

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