Landing a new job is quite a challenge today. It is even more of a challenge to find a job in another state or even country. As a rule, it extends the job search period significantly since the companies often prefer local candidates over people from other states or countries. However, if you are planning to relocate, it doesn’t have to mean you’ve got no chances. Relocation shouldn’t be some kind of a disadvantage that will make it very difficult to get a job offer. There are things out-of-state job seekers can do to minimize the concerns the hiring managers might have in regard to relocation issues. 

Why Is Relocation a Problem for Employers?

Before you address relocation on your application documents, it is important to understand the reasons why companies prefer locals over out-of-state candidates. There may be multiple nuances but usually, it all boils down to the employers’ valuable resources: time and money. No one can argue with the fact that hiring people from different states and countries is associated with increased costs. Additionally, local prospects typically can begin work right after the job offer is made. Those residing in different states usually need additional time to relocate. 

Besides, you can’t deny the fact that relocation brings additional risks both for the employers as well as for the job seekers. What happens if the move doesn’t really work out for you? In most cases, it means you would want either to go back or find a new place. For the employer, it means going through the hiring rigmarole all over again (which is additional expenses). 

If you take the job search seriously, it is important to understand the most common concerns the companies might have in regard to relocation. The question is how can you tailor the application effectively and address these issues?

How to Mention Relocation in a Cover Letter?

Before you meet the hiring authorities at the interview, your application is the only chance to impress your prospective employers and address relocation concerns they might have. There is not much you can do with your resume because its format doesn’t imply the section where you could properly address the relocation issues. All you can do is add the statement that you are willing to relocate next to your address on a resume. Depending on your plans you can either be specific (i.e. “Relocating to New York in November 2019”) or generic (i.e. “Available to relocate nationwide”). This only informs prospective employers of your intentions to relocate but doesn’t really address any potential issues.

On the other hand, a cover letter is a perfect tool which gives more freedom to elaborate on the subject explaining why relocation will not be a problem for the company. A cover letter may be a thing of the past in some cases but relocation is one of those exceptions when it can actually save your application. All you need to do is to tackle all of the challenges related to your move and convince the hiring manager that hiring you will not be much different from hiring a local candidate. Below you will find key components of an effective relocation cover letter that will help you properly address the employers’ concerns.

1. Explain why you are relocating. There is a huge difference between planning to move to a new city and applying for a nice job in a different state. Employers are well aware of this difference and that’s why they often question whether out-of-state candidates are serious about the move. Explaining why you decided to make the move will help them eliminate the doubts in regard to your dedication. No need to go into details – don’t waste valuable space on your letter with unnecessary information no one wants to know. Just list concrete reasons to show that your intention isn’t the stretch of your imagination but a done deal. Here are some examples of how you can do it: 

 2. Provide a date. This should really help employers feel more comfortable about giving you an interview call. Providing a date or a period for your arrival is another proof that your intention to move is serious. Often the companies can’t afford spending months on hiring someone. When it comes to filling in the position, it is always the sooner, the better. Therefore, providing your arrival date (hopefully in the nearest future) should help put their mind at ease. It may well be that you don’t have the date yet, just let them known how much time you would need to complete the move if offered the job. It is important to be realistic in your projections though. In a cover letter, it could look something like this:

 3. Offer an in-person visit. Since you live in a different state or even country, it is likely that you will have a remote interview via phone, Skype or some other platform (if your resume is good enough). However, it is very unlikely that you will be able to land a job with just a phone call. Most employers would want to talk to you in person before making any decisions. More than that, accepting a job offer without a face-to-face meeting is risky for you, as a job seeker. It is best if you can learn more about the company and its culture by visiting their office. For example, you could say something like this:

It is important to make it clear that you are open to an in-person visit (at least if your remote interview goes well). Don’t mention anything about travel expenses. At this stage, it is not a good time to talk about money.  Focus on expressing your desire to learn more about the opportunity.

Relocation Cover Letter Example

A relocation cover letter isn’t much different from cover letter examples you can find online. The difference is usually a couple of sentences (that can turn everything around for long-distance job candidates). The best way to address relocation is to include a brief paragraph at the very end of the letter. When job seekers choose to do it at the very beginning, they somewhat shift the focus from the job and their qualifications (which should be the most important information) to relocation concerns (secondary matters for employers). 

Here is a relocation cover letter example:

Relocation Cover Letter Example (Text Version)

Dear Mr. Smith:

I am writing in response to the present job opening for a Sales Manager found at indeed.com/jobid928618308. In my search for a new challenge in sales, I was pleased to find this position open at Business Pro, Ltd. as I believe that my track of sales accomplishments along with y commitment become a valuable asset for the company. Eager to learn more about this opportunity, I have enclosed my resume for your perusal.

As my career profile illustrates, I am well-prepared to penetrating new territories and exceeding sales targets. Having served as a Sales Manager within the construction industry, I am accustomed to the rigors of the highly-regulated environment requiring consummate accuracy and excellent communication skills. If given the opportunity, I will be more than happy to deliver similar results for Business Pro, Ltd. while collaborating with your staff to accelerate the achievement of your short- and long-range goals.

Further, I would bring the following strengths to your team: 

- Penetrating new sales territories and increasing sales by over 30% through implementing new marketing programs.

- Training new sales associates to improve the overall efficiency of the sales team by 50%. 

I would welcome the chance to meet you in person and discuss the opening in detail. My husband has recently accepted the executive job offer at JPMorgan Chase & Co. and we will be moving to Boston in the middle of August. I can start working within only one week after an offer, as we have already bought an apartment in Phoenix. I am also open to traveling to Phoenix for an in-person interview at a mutually convenient time.

Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to hearing from you!

Sincerely,

Jane Doe